Private Knee Replacement in the US and Canada

In 2020, an estimated 1.2 million Canadians were waiting for a medical procedure. Specialists’ physicians reported a record wait time of 22.6 weeks across the country. The wait times vary widely depending on which province you live in. Some Canadians, unsatisfied with these long wait times, choose to pay out of pocket for surgery or treatment and travel to the US or other Canadian provinces to obtain private care.

If you are seeking private surgery or diagnostics, Health Vantis can help. Our approach is simple and transparent. We have done a lot of research so that you don’t have to waste your time and can focus on your health. We visited most of the facilities we work with. We looked into the medical facilities’ accreditations, infection rates, and re-admittance rates. We checked the doctors’ credentials and patient experience feedback.

When you call us, we will try to give you more than one geographical option, although sometimes it is not possible due to limited affordable private facilities in the US and Canada.

From your first phone call our process will look like this:

  1. We have a conversation with you about the issue you are enquiring to get more details, what has been done prior to your call,
    your expectations, and the general timeline. This will help us determine if we can help.
  2. If we are able to help and you would like to go forward, we will need to collect all your medical records. In order for us to be able to view your records, a Release and Consent form needs to be signed and a small admin fee paid. We will submit the records for a medical review at one or more medical facilities. Once we get feedback from them, including estimated pricing, a phone or video consultation is set up to talk to your doctor.
  3. After the consult, it is up to you if you would like to proceed with your private surgery or treatment. If your decision is to go ahead, we will make all the arrangements for you, including a date for surgery, pre-op consult, accommodations, airfare and transportation. We will provide you with your personalized medical travel guide that will include every piece of information needed. No detail is overlooked. Once your surgery is complete, we will check in on you until you are back home and fully recovered. If there is a need for physical therapy upon return home, we will make advanced arrangements for you.

It is important to mention that we do not hide our fees in the total price. Our fees are paid directly to us, and fees for surgery are paid directly to the facility. This transparent process is honest and trustworthy. Some medical concierge services provide you a total price, but you will never know what your surgery really costs and what they withhold as their fee.

Knee replacements have longer wait times than other surgeries in Canada. Even though doctors think you can wait, sometimes the price of waiting and living in pain is not worth it. Private knee replacement is an option for all Canadians.

If you are looking to find out more details about what your private options for surgery may be, please email us at info@healthvantis.com or give us a call at toll-free 877 344 3544.

Private Hip Replacement in the US and Canada

It is estimated that in 2020, the total number of procedures for which Canadians were waiting for exceeded 1.2 million. Specialists’ physicians reported a record wait time of 22.6 weeks across the country and these wait times vary widely depending on which province you reside in. Some Canadians choose the private way of obtaining healthcare, which means that they are paying for it twice – once through their taxes and a second time when they go for private surgery.

If you are seeking private diagnostics or surgery, Health Vantis can help. We offer a simple and transparent approach to finding out your private healthcare options. We have done a lot of research so that you don’t have to waste your time and can focus on your health. We visited most of the facilities we work with. We looked into medical facilities’ accreditations, infection rates, and re-admission rates. We checked the doctors’ credentials and patient experience feedback.

When you call us, we will try to give you more than one geographical option, although sometimes it is not possible due to limited affordable private facilities in the US and Canada.

From your first phone call our process will look like this:

  1. We have a conversation with you about the issue you are enquiring to get more details, what has been done prior to your call, your expectations, and the general timeline. This will help us determine if we can help.
  2. If we are able to help and you would like to go forward, we will need to collect all your medical records. In order for us to be able to view your records, a Release and Consent form needs to be signed and a small admin fee paid. We will submit the records for a medical review at one or more medical facilities. Once we get feedback from them, including estimated pricing, a phone or video consultation is set up to talk to your doctor.
  3. After the consult, it is up to you if you would like to proceed with your private surgery or treatment. If your decision is to go ahead, we will make all the arrangements for you, including the date for surgery, pre-op consult, accommodations, airfare and transportation. We will provide you with your personalized medical travel guide that will include every piece of information needed. No detail is overlooked. Once your surgery is complete, we will check in on you until you are back home and fully recovered. If there is a need for physical therapy upon return home, we will make advanced arrangements for you.

It is important to mention that we do not hide our fees in the total price. Our fees are paid directly to us, and fees for surgery are paid directly to the facility. This transparent process allows you to know who gets paid. Some medical concierge services provide you a total price, but you will never know what your surgery really costs and what they withheld as their fee.

Hip replacements have longer wait times than other surgeries in Canada. Even though doctors think you can wait, sometimes the price of waiting and living in pain is not worth it. Private hip replacement is an option for all Canadians.

If you are looking to find out more details about what your private options for surgery may be, please email us at info@healthvantis.com or give us a call at toll-free 877 344 3544.

6 Tips for Traveling After a Knee Replacement

6 Things You Should Not Do When Traveling After a Knee Replacement

Knee replacement surgery is considered a major surgery.  It can take weeks to heal to get your full mobility back.  The surgeon will prepare you for your rehab and how you need to care for your new knee but what about your trip home?  This is something surgeons might not always think about so here are 6 tips for you to consider prior to your travel home.

Avoid traveling too soon – Your doctor will tell you when its safe to drive or fly home after your surgery.  If you don’t feel like you are well enough to leave when you’ve been released, then trust your own body and stay an extra day.  It will be worth it in the end if you feel healthier during your travels.

Make your trip comfortable – Flying can present some issues after a surgery.  Any flight over 4 hours can increase your risk for a DVT.   The best way to avoid this is to be sure and get up and move as much as you can, which can be hard right after knee surgery.  You can also ask your doctor for TED hose, which will help with circulation.  Be sure to have your pain medication, bottled water and a blanket or pillow to make the journey as comfortable as possible.

Never take your trip alone – One requirement in traveling for surgery is to take a travel companion.  None of the facilities within the US and Canada will allow someone to have surgery if they do not have a trusted adult staying with them for the first 24 hours after surgery.  Taking an Uber back to your hotel by yourself is not acceptable and not in your best interest should you need immediate care while you are resting in your hotel.  It is also helpful to have someone else there to assist you as you are recuperating in the hotel and on your travels back to help with luggage and getting to and from the gate.

Pack essentials – Packing things ‘just in case’ is always smart.  These should be kept on your person or carry on bag for easy access.  Things like pain medications, blankets, pillows, comfy clothes, headphones and extra bandages are examples of items you might consider taking.

Ask for anti-nausea medication – Anesthesia can make people very nauseous post surgery.  Motion sickness is also very common.  If you have ever experienced either of these in the past, ask your doctor to write you a prescription for an anti-nausea medication and keep it with you in the event you have an episode.  Be sure to pack some crackers, ginger ale or other things that are light on your stomach.  Try not to skip meals as having some food in your stomach will help.  Taking some medications on an empty stomach can also cause nausea or upset stomach problems.

Take it easy – Be sure to take things slowly.  You will have days where you feel great but always follow your doctors recommendations on your limitations so you do not over do or undo what was just fixed.  Surgery creates a lot of swelling and this can take weeks to subside.  Pushing yourself too hard too early can sometimes reverse what was just done.  Give your body the time it needs to heal.

If you are considering a private surgery, give Health Vantis a call.  We have experience in making your journey a safe and successful one.

 

Health Vantis

www.healthvantis.ca

877-344-3544

info@healthvantis.com

6 Things You Should Not Do When Traveling After a Hip Replacement

6 Things You Should Not Do When Traveling After a Hip Replacement

Hip replacement surgery is considered a major surgery.  It can take weeks to heal to get your full mobility back.  The surgeon will prepare you for your rehab and how you need to care for your new hip but what about your trip home?  This is something surgeons might not always think about so here are 6 tips for you to consider prior to your travel home.

  1. Avoid traveling too soon – Your doctor will tell you when its safe to drive or fly home after your surgery.  If you don’t feel like you are well enough to leave when you’ve been released, then trust your own body and stay an extra day.  It will be worth it in the end if you feel healthier during your travels.  
  2. Make your trip comfortable – Flying can present some issues after a surgery.  Any flight over 4 hours can increase your risk for a DVT.   The best way to avoid this is to be sure and get up and move as much as you can.  You can also ask your doctor for TED hose, which will help with circulation.  Be sure to have your pain medication, bottled water and a blanket or pillow to make the journey as comfortable as possible.
  3. Never take your trip alone – One requirement in traveling for surgery is to take a travel companion.  None of the facilities within the US and Canada will allow someone to have surgery if they do not have a trusted adult staying with them for the first 24 hours after surgery.  Taking an Uber back to your hotel by yourself is not acceptable and not in your best interest should you need immediate care while you are resting in your hotel.  It is also helpful to have someone else there to assist you as you are recuperating in the hotel and on your travels back to help with luggage and getting to and from the gate.
  4. Pack essentials – Packing things ‘just in case’ is always smart.  These should be kept on your person or carry on bag for easy access.  Things like pain medications, blankets, pillows, comfy clothes, headphones and extra bandages are examples of items you might consider taking.
  5. Ask for anti-nausea medication – Anesthesia can make people very nauseous post surgery.  Motion sickness is also very common.  If you have ever experienced either of these in the past, ask your doctor to write you a prescription for an anti-nausea medication and keep it with you in the event you have an episode.  Be sure to pack some crackers, ginger ale or other things that are light on your stomach.  Try not to skip meals as having some food in your stomach will help.  Taking some medications on an empty stomach can also cause nausea or upset stomach problems.
  6. Take it easy – Be sure to take things slowly.  You will have days where you feel great but always follow your doctors recommendations on your limitations so you do not over do or undo what was just fixed.  Surgery creates a lot of swelling and this can take weeks to subside.  Pushing yourself too hard too early can sometimes reverse what was just done.  Give your body the time it needs to heal.

If you are considering a private surgery, give Health Vantis a call.  We have experience in making your journey a safe and successful one.  

Health Vantis

www.healthvantis.ca

877-344-3544

info@healthvantis.com

Exercise After Private Joint Replacement

Are you going for a hip or knee replacement or just had one? Are you wondering how the recovery will go? Well, it depends not only on the outcomes of your surgery but also on you and how committed you are to your recovery process. In other words, you will have to work hard consistently to make sure that your recovery is progressing.

After a joint replacement surgery, your exercises program should start on the same day, after you recover from the anesthesia. It needs to be done under close supervision and the assistance of a physiotherapist. An experienced professional will guide you through a number of exercises to build up your muscles around your new knee or hip. Strengthening these muscles will help support your new joint. Balance and flexibility exercises are also important and your physiotherapist will introduce those to you and observe you doing them, advising on corrections if necessary.

You will also need to do cardio exercises to get your heart rate up. Walking with poles is an option if you are experiencing challenges with balance and stability. The elliptical machine and stationary bicycle are good options as well. They are low impact and will get you started until you get into the swing of peddling with your new joint.

When going for your private hip replacement, make sure you have a plan for post-op recovery exercise. If you already have a physiotherapist, keep working with them after your surgery. If you need to find someone, ask your medical facilitator to connect you to one. If you have any questions about private hip or knee replacement and what it may involve, please reach out to us tool free 877 344 3544 or email info@healthvantis.com

Private Hip/Knee Replacement or a New Car? You Decide!

With wait times increasing due to the pandemic, more and more Canadians are taking a number and waiting. Even though hip and knee replacements are much needed surgeries, they are considered elective, or non-urgent. According to the provincial website in Nova Scotia a hip replacement is done for 90% of the people within 568 days. Add to that 219 days it takes to get a consult with an orthopedic surgeon. That is 2.15 years!

If you were to go the private route, the costs are to be considered, of course. In the US those vary depending on where you go, and start from about USD$26,000. There are options in Canada too, roughly the same price but in Canadian dollars.

When considering those costs, take into account how waiting affects you and your family. Are you able to wait longer? One of our private hip replacement clients provided this insight: “Consider what stage of life you are at and the preciousness of your mobility. I was concerned about getting it too soon and having to get another one in my 70s. Now that I have the new hip and the new lease on life, there is no doubt in my mind that I made the right decision. Let’s put it this way: I could have gotten a new car or a new hip. My new hip is 100 times more precious to me than a new car.”

If you would like to find out your private hip or knee replacement options give us a call at toll free 877 344 3544.

Recovery Journal Written By a Hip Replacement Client, Oct. 2020

Recovery Journal Written By a Hip Replacement Client, Oct. 2020

In last week’s blog, we spotlighted one of our recent client’s, Teresa Hannah, who had a hip replacement done in the US.  She took extra care in her recovery process and even journaled some of her post surgery progress for those first few weeks.  Although every individual is different, we thought it would be  great to show her documented journey as a possible expectation of how you might recover.  Keep in mind, Teresa was in incredible shape and did a lot of athletic exercise in the way of hiking, yoga and biking.  Teresa’s surgery took place on October 30, 2020.

Nov 24 – Was first day I got on stationary bike at PT.   Did it for 10 minutes on 24 – what is 24? and more like 20 minutes on 26.  (This was just 3 1/2 weeks post surgery!)

Nov 25 (Wed am) – I am sleeping better.   I am mostly down to the 2 daily aspirin for blood thinning and one type of pain killer in the AM – either two Ibprophen or two Tylenol. (No narcotics!) Still very stiff and tricky to put weigh -? on when first get out of bed in AM.  Once I move around it gets better. Increasing the number of 15 minute walks, and focusing on form, on resuming a graceful gait.  I no longer feel like I am holding my breath to manage the pain when I walk. Range of motion almost in normal range in terms of PT – internal rotation to right is still not quite there. Scar healing well.  Steri strips off on Sunday. Can do modest clam shells again- yay! What are clam shells? Still using my stick in house, but can tell that discomfort when putting full weight on left leg is subsiding. Still moving slowly around house, especially when first get up after sitting.

Nov 26 – Did a 30 minute walk, and another 15 minute walk later in day.  Did bike for about 15-20 minutes.    Up and about in town doing errands for about an hour.    Then dinner, cleanup, and prep that evening took probably a good 30 minutes.  Today, as I go through my daily motions, I shall approach it ALL with a mindset of Thanksgiving (maybe worth mentioning that she is both CAD and US).  A mindset of how positive all the movement is.  How nicely the healing is progressing. I can spend a little time lying in bed on my left side with a pillow helping to prop my knees off the bed. I can do girl push ups without having my bum way up in the air.

Nov 27 – Was first day that I reduced the drug intake to one tablet of either 500 mg Tyl or 200 mg IB each day.   One 30 minute walk, and one 15 minute walk.

Nov 28 – Pain at 3.5-4 in AM.  Realized I needed to skip walking today.   Did bike for 2-15 minute stretches.   Shopped on feet for an hour.   Did PT exercises, puttered decorating the house.  That was it.

Nov 29 – 3-25 minute walks spread through-out the day.   Felt pretty decent.  Pain about 1.5 in AM.  Higher than that by end of day. Somewhere around here my body really wanted me to start doing modified sun salutations which I did.

Nov 30 – Chris (PT guy) approved of my modified sun salutations and was fine with me doing a full plank on way down, but my body let me know I needed to lower myself all the way to floor and then push up from that postition and not staying in a plank. Ever since Nov 26 (one week ago), I have mostly reduced my drug intake to either 200 MG of IB or 500 MG of Tylenol.  Generally take it in the morning. Some mornings the discomfort (after being out of bed for 5-10 minutes) is a 1.5.   Other mornings it is a 4 (out of 10). This morning, after having 2 half-hour (or at least 25 minute) GOOD walks yesterday, where I was barely putting weight on the sticks and was moving at a mostly normal pace, and a 20 minute stationery bike ride (where I actually worked up a sweat, despite the low resistance of Gear 2 on right and one on left), and after having done more reps of the PT exercises, I notice my lower back is very tired and a bit painful.  Like those muscles are working overtime.  This morning, pain back up to 3.5-4 in am.  See how it goes each day. I find myself moving around the house on some days (not all yet by any stretch), with relative alacrity (not like my self from 2 years ago, but heading in the right direction).  I can stand with reasonable comfort for longer periods, like last night in kitchen – after 20 or so minutes of cleaning up, still felt comfortable. Observed to husband that I am on fewer painkillers now than in summer.  And we both observed that I am way better than last winter when I was so tangled up.

Dec 3 (Thursday AM) – Moving around the house with no hiking stick for the most part, other than when get up in middle of night, still use it sometimes to steady myself.  Painful and stiff when first try to get moving out of bed or if have been sitting for a long time.

We recently spoke to Teresa to do the April Newsletter and she is still doing amazing.  She was still happy with the results and so glad she had the surgery.

 

Health Vantis

www.healthvantis.ca

877-344-3544

info@healthvantis.com

Is It Safe to Delay Hip Replacement Surgery?

If you are experiencing hip pain due to osteoarthritis, you may be wondering when it is time to consider surgery and if it is safe for you to delay surgical interventions. As we age, arthritis progresses, and the pain can become severe.

Hip replacement surgery is one of the most successful surgeries done today. Does that mean you should get one as soon as you feel pain in your hip? Not quite, say the experts. In many cases osteoarthritis pain can be managed with physiotherapy, a weight loss regimen, modifying your activities and taking anti-inflammatory over the counter medications. These conservative approaches may work for some time.

However, if your pain is so severe that you are experiencing it while resting, its time to talk to an orthopedic surgeon. Arthritis of the joint can not only cause pain in the hip but also in the knee, groin, lower back and buttocks. If the pain and inflammation begin affecting your ability to do daily activities and you are no longer able to take shorter walks, get dressed or put shoes on without debilitating pain, you may want to seek a hip replacement surgery.

Waiting too long has consequences. The surgery can be less effective because due to all the limited mobility and activity, your overall health can worsen. People that are going into surgery healthier tend to have better outcomes. Badly deteriorated joints can make surgery more difficult to perform, requiring special skill and additional physiotherapy afterwards.

Most hip replacement implants last 10 to 20 years. For many people, that means that if they got their hip replacement in their early 60-ies, it would last them for the rest of their lives. The concerns of having a revision surgery somewhere down the road should be discussed with your orthopedic surgeon. Surgeons and patients should work together to ensure the best outcome.

If you are placed on a long waiting list for surgery and are unable to see an orthopedic specialist in the public system, we can help connect you to a private option for your total hip replacement. We can get your X-ray reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon in a private, no wait manner.  Give us a call toll-free 877 344 3544 and find out your private total hip replacement options in the US and Canada.

Is It Safe to Delay Private Knee Replacement?

Arthritis can damage our joints as we age. In some cases, the pain is so severe that one has to get a total knee replacement. This joint replacement surgery corrects the worn our knee surfaces and the mechanics in knee movement. The ideal result is a pain-free, stable and aligned joint.

Delaying total knee replacement can have negative effects on postoperative outcomes and recovery. Arthritis is a progressive disease and damages knee joints over time. The more damage occurs the more your body will need to adapt to a new “damaged” condition of your knee. Sometimes these adaptations create deformities of the knee joint and stretch out the ligaments of the knee. As a result, the movements of your limbs become irregular, muscles and bones get weaker and there is more pressure put on other parts of your body such as the ankle, hip and spine.

On the other hand, having a total knee replacement too early can result in revision surgery somewhere down the road. Studies show that the younger you are at the time of total knee replacement the more likely it is that you will need revision surgery. Revision surgeries are complex, require specialized skill and the outcomes are rarely as good as the initial surgery.

The decision to delay your total knee replacement is a personal one and should be discussed with your orthopedic surgeon in detail. In some instances, it is safe to delay the surgery and manage arthritis pain conservatively. Losing weight is among one of those measures. It can relieve the stress your body has on your knee joint. A study done with overweight and obese adults with knee osteoarthritis found that losing one pound of weight resulted in four pounds of pressure being removed from the knees. Yet another study showed that losing 10–20 percent of starting body weight improved pain, function, and quality of life better than losing just five percent of body weight.

However, if your pain is long-lasting, is present when you are resting and is interfering with your day to day activities, it is time to talk to a doctor about possible surgery. Surgeons and patients should work together to ensure the best outcome.

If you are placed on a long waiting list and are unable to see an orthopedic specialist in the public system, we can help connect you to a private option for your total knee replacement. We can get your X-ray reviewed by an orthopedic surgeon in a private, no wait manner. Give us a call toll-free 877 344 3544 and find out your private total knee replacement options in the US and Canada.

Knee Replacement Improvements

The expertise for knee replacements have improved leaps and bounds over the years.  What used to require a 4-5 day hospital stay is a thing of the past. Knee replacements can now be done on an out patient basis.  They have you up and walking within hours of your surgery.

The surgery centers we work with are able to do newer techniques which provide huge benefits.  There are virtually zero complications.  Getting you up and moving so quickly helps keep the circulation moving which creates less potential for a blood clot.
The facilities are spotless.  Their cleaning protocols have resulted in less than a 1% chance of getting a surgery related infection. The incisions are much smaller which also creates less chance for infection at the wound site.
Opioids used to be routinely given to patients dealing with knee pain.  They have gotten a lot stricter on who and how much they prescribe due to addiction concerns.  Any surgery is painful and you almost always need some sort of pain medication post op to handle the pain.  One of our facilities in particular has created a program that begins prior to surgery to reduce the need for opioids.   A high percentage of their patients do not even need opioids post op.  Avoiding opioids not only prevents an addiction, it also provides less chance for side effects such as dizziness, nausea or constipation.
Other countries such as India may be able to offer a lower cost for a knee replacement.  Buyer beware, you sometimes get what you pay for.  Not only is it a significant flight and travel time which can increase your chances of a blood clot and uncomfortableness in sitting still for hours, many of these facilities can not provide the same benefits that they can in the US and Canada.
If you are considering a private knee replacement, contact Health Vantis to find out your options. We have several reasonably priced facilities that can do a safe, affordable and state of the art surgery.
Health Vantis
877-344-3544
info@healthvantis.com