EMG In Canada

EMG’s (Electomyography) is a diagnostic test utilized to assess the condition of the muscles and nerve cells that control them.  Many things can be ruled out or diagnosed with this test such as carpal tunnel syndrome, muscle dystrophy or Lou Gehrig disease.

The wait times vary province to province.  Based on conversations with customers, some provinces such as Nova Scotia, can have wait times up to 2 years.  In other provinces like Alberta, the wait could be 2-6 months.  The downside is that there are not many clinics that can do EMG’s on a private basis if you wish to have this done in Canada.  For residents of  Nova Scotia, the closest place would be in Ontario.  If you are in Ontario and/or have OHIP, you cannot have it done on a private basis within the province.  You would have to travel to another province just as someone in Nova Scotia does.  Needless to say, it can be tricky. 

The clinics set the pricing themselves.  The costs will vary greatly from place to place. 

If you are willing to travel to the US, we have affordable options right across the border from Ontario.  While the border is still closed, traveling for medical purposes is deemed essential and can be done.  The concern for COVID-19 is obviously in the back of everyones minds but you can rest assured, these facilities have multiple safety measures in place to protect you to the fullest extent.  

If you would like more information on how we can connect you to a private facility and what their costs are, please contact us info@healthvantis.com or 877-344-3544 and we’d be happy to help.  

5 Tips While Flying During COVID-19

5 Tips If You Travel During COVID-19

Travel seemed to come to a complete halt a few months back due to the pandemic.  As restrictions have lifted and summer has arrived, people have started to slowly resume their willingness to travel.  While there is risk no matter what you do right now, traveling is one you can take a few extra precautions with to ensure you are minimizing your chances of acquiring COVID-19.

Check the local COVID-19

– All states, provinces and countries have varying restrictions right now.  Be sure to review their up to date policies on coming to their city/state/province or country before arriving.  You may be required to self quarantine for 14 days upon arrival or provide a negative COVID-19 test to enter.  Also take note of the rules your own state, province or country has on returning home.  Informing yourself about respective guidelines coming and going could prevent you from having to return home and keep you as safe as possible.

Driving vs Flying

– Many people are fearful of flying right now, however, per the US CDC, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes.  The issue revolves around the ability to social distance, or lack there of.  There may be situations where it is a crowded flight and you are forced to sit next to someone less than 6 feet away from you that could be a carrier.  Taking a bus or driving can also pose increased risks.  There are still stops for food, gas and bathroom breaks that can put you in close contact with others and touching surfaces.  The key is to be aware of your surroundings, wear your mask and make sure you are washing or sanitizing your hands after you’ve touched public surfaces.

Anticipate Your Travel Needs

– Wearing a mask has been proven to help reduce your chances of getting or passing along the COVID-19 virus.  Make sure you have a mask with you at all times.  It is wise to bring a couple of extra ones in case you lose one or it gets dirty.  Having a few extra zip lock bags to store them in after each use will also keep them from being set down on a surface that might have germs.  Bring your own food and drinks when possible.  This will reduce contact with others in ordering.  Make sure you also have hand sanitizer or disinfectant wipes for situations where soap and water are not available.

Hotels and Lodging 

-Review the hotels updated policies on how they are handling the cleaning of your room and their common areas.  Many places have suspended daily room cleaning unless requested and the majority of them have provided hand sanitizer every where you turn.  All major chains are taking extra precautions to sanitize your room, however, to err on the side of caution, take your own clorox or disinfecting wipes and clean all high touch surfaces such as door knobs, light switches and faucets for good measure.  You can always request a room that has been vacant for at least 24 hours.  Many hotels are not up to 100% capacity so this might be an easy request to accommodate.  Always wear your mask in the lobby and hallways as you are moving through the hotel, especially in the elevator.  Elevators are small spaces and someone who was not masked up could have coughed or sneezed prior to you coming on and the particles might still be in the air.  Only ride with the people in your party and wait for the next elevator should there be people you don’t know already in there.  This not only protects you, it also gives the other riders their own space.

Be Patient

– Public places have been given the burden of taking extra safety measures to keep their doors open.  This can create long delays or a situation of not having access to what you traveled there for.  Try to be as patient with the employees and delays as much as possible.  They are only doing their job to make things safer for you.  Give them an extra smile or a compliment of thanks or gratitude to show your appreciation of their extra efforts for you.

Health Vantis

www.healthvantis.ca

877-344-3544

August 2020 Newsletter

 

5 Tips If You Travel During COVID-19

Travel seemed to come to a complete halt a few months back due to the pandemic.  As restrictions have lifted and summer has arrived, people have started to slowly resume their willingness to travel.  While there is risk no matter what you do right now, traveling is one you can take a few extra precautions with to ensure you are minimizing your chances of acquiring COVID-19.

Check the local COVID-19

– All states, provinces and countries have varying restrictions right now.  Be sure to review their up to date policies on coming to their city/state/province or country before arriving.  You may be required to self quarantine for 14 days upon arrival or provide a negative COVID-19 test to enter.  Also take note of the rules your own state, province or country has on returning home.  Informing yourself about respective guidelines coming and going could prevent you from having to return home and keep you as safe as possible.

Driving vs Flying

– Many people are fearful of flying right now, however, per the US CDC, most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes.  The issue revolves around the ability to social distance, or lack there of.  There may be situations where it is a crowded flight and you are forced to sit next to someone less than 6 feet away from you that could be a carrier.  Taking a bus or driving can also pose increased risks.  There are still stops for food, gas and bathroom breaks that can put you in close contact with others and touching surfaces.  The key is to be aware of your surroundings, wear your mask and make sure you are washing or sanitizing your hands after you’ve touched public surfaces. 

Anticipate Your Travel Needs

– Wearing a mask has been proven to help reduce your chances of getting or passing along the COVID-19 virus.  Make sure you have a mask with you at all times.  It is wise to bring a couple of extra ones in case you lose one or it gets dirty.  Having a few extra zip lock bags to store them in after each use will also keep them from being set down on a surface that might have germs.  Bring your own food and drinks when possible.  This will reduce contact with others in ordering.  Make sure you also have hand sanitizer or disinfectant wipes for situations where soap and water are not available. 

Hotels and Lodging 

-Review the hotels updated policies on how they are handling the cleaning of your room and their common areas.  Many places have suspended daily room cleaning unless requested and the majority of them have provided hand sanitizer every where you turn.  All major chains are taking extra precautions to sanitize your room, however, to err on the side of caution, take your own clorox or disinfecting wipes and clean all high touch surfaces such as door knobs, light switches and faucets for good measure.  You can always request a room that has been vacant for at least 24 hours.  Many hotels are not up to 100% capacity so this might be an easy request to accommodate.  Always wear your mask in the lobby and hallways as you are moving through the hotel, especially in the elevator.  Elevators are small spaces and someone who was not masked up could have coughed or sneezed prior to you coming on and the particles might still be in the air.  Only ride with the people in your party and wait for the next elevator should there be people you don’t know already in there.  This not only protects you, it also gives the other riders their own space.

Be Patient

– Public places have been given the burden of taking extra safety measures to keep their doors open.  This can create long delays or a situation of not having access to what you traveled there for.  Try to be as patient with the employees and delays as much as possible.  They are only doing their job to make things safer for you.  Give them an extra smile or a compliment of thanks or gratitude to show your appreciation of their extra efforts for you.

 

 

5 Things An Excellent Hospital Should Have If You Travel For Medical Reasons 

Are you traveling for medical care and wonder what’s important in a hospital?  See below for some things to consider in selecting your hospital of choice.

1.The first place you should start is to research the hospital where you will have the surgery to ensure it is reputable and has appropriate accreditation.  The most recognized one is Joint Commission International (JCI). It is considered a gold standard in global healthcare.  Other organizations such as Accreditation Canada and Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) are a couple of others that are acceptable.

All facilities in the US and Canada are required to have these types of accreditation.  We have come across hospitals in other countries that claim they are ‘accredited’.  This can be misleading to the patient.  The accreditations they list do not have the same standards that the JCI or AAAHC has.

A hospital that has one of these accreditations will have the procedures in place that measure:

⁃patient rights and education

⁃infection control

⁃medication management to prevent medical errors

⁃the process on how the hospital verifies that its doctors, nurses and other staff qualification and competency

⁃what preparations are there for emergencies

⁃how it collects data on its performance and uses that data to improve itself 

Risks associated with a facility that does NOT have the appropriate accreditation could include: 

⁃blood not being screened for HIV or Hepatitis

⁃reuse of syringes

⁃antibody resistance 

⁃poor quality medications

⁃doctors or nurses that are not qualified

⁃higher risk of infection rate

2.Look at the hospital infection, re-admission and mortality rates and compare it to a state, province or country average. This should be available on the hospital website or you can also check with the state or provinces’ department of health. Many of them now require monitoring for serious reportable events or incidents.  

3. How do they handle your medical records and information?  In the US and Canada, hospitals must adhere to standards such as HIPAA and PIPEDA.  This is a law that protects the patients’ data and medical history.  

4. Doctors and nurses that have experience in working with International patients and speak English fluently.  This may seem obvious but not all International hospitals will have English speaking doctors and staff.  This is incredibly important because you need to be able to understand everything being said.  There needs to be an English speaking guide to get you to and from where you need to be in the hospital as well as have an English speaking doctor and nurse that will be treating you.  

5. Know what their emergency protocol is should there be one.  What precautions do they take and what type of life saving measures do they have?  Are they partnered with another larger hospital?  Is their equipment up to date?

Contact Health Vantis for more information on how to choose the right facility/hospital for you!  Your safety is important to us and we verify all 5 of these points for you.

 

 

World Humanitarian Day

World Humanitarian Day is August 19th.  This is a day to commemorate all of the aide and health care workers who provide life saving support and protection to those in need.  This year is especially important to honour them in light of the pandemic.  Thank you to all of our health care workers world wide for your time and dedication these past few months.

 

 

 

Wait Time Updates – COVID-19

Update On Wait Times During COVID-19

It is no secret Canada has some of the longest medical waits times out of all Universal Health Care countries.  Due to the COVID shutdowns and non-urgent surgeries being put on a temporary hold, you would think there would be significant increases in wait times. 

In Nova Scotia with a population of around 1MM province wide, about 25,000 people are waiting for surgical procedures.  Approximately 1,075 of those are cancer patients.  During the shut downs, about 3.600 surgeries were cancelled.  Some have suggested this will take an additional 2 years to catch up but Greg Hirsch, head of surgical services at the Nova Scotia Health Authority said that might be a little excessive.  

We have been monitoring the wait times on the Nova Scotia website for the past few months.  Here are the numbers that have been posted:

March 1, 2020-May 31,2020 April 1, 2020-June 30, 2020
# of Days for a Hip Replacement Consult 

189

143

# of Days for a Hip Replacement Surgery

466

363

# of Days for a Knee Replacement Consult 

167

161

# of Days for a Knee Replacement Surgery

539

626

# of Days for a Back Surgery Consult 

277

196

# of Days for a Back Surgery

115

191

As you can see, the number of days for surgery has increased by 14% for knee replacement surgery and by 40% for back surgery.  Hip replacement has decreased by 22%.  

Nova Scotia has done a great job at keeping the COVID-19 cases down, however, another wave of infections is projected to come which might result in more cancellations.  

Knowing your options of what you can do to get your surgery sooner or how to go about getting in a private manner can be overwhelming, especially with so many changes and restrictions placed on private facilities.  Contact Health Vantis is you have questions about your situation and what we can do to help you find the right private facility to address your needs at 877-344-3544 or info@healthvantis.com.

 

Health Vantis

877-344-3544

www.healthvantis.ca

info@healthvantis.com

Flying With Back Pain

5 Tips for Flying with Back Pain

Back pain is one of the most common ailments people suffer from.  It can limit your activity level and make some things such as traveling difficult to do.  Sitting for long periods of time and lugging or carrying heavy items such as your baggage can be a deterrent.  Here are 5 tips to try so you don’t have to cancel your trip:

  1. Upgrade Your Seats

    – If you can afford it, consider booking a business class or first class seat.  Or, if you have the points, utilize them to upgrade.  This allows for more leg room and seat space.  You also don’t feel like you are crowded on top of the person next to you and will give you more room to move around within the seat.  Some airlines also have seats that are 1 step above basic economy that provide additional leg room for a smaller fee.  If extra funds are not available for the additional cost to upgrade, then request an aisle seat so you can easily get up and move around every so often.  It will make for stretching your legs easier and you won’t have to disturb your seat mate should you need to stand up.  You could also request an emergency row exit seat, assuming you’d be up for the task should there be a true emergency.  

  2. Take Steps To Manage Your Stress

    – Back pain already provides emotional stress.  It can make your symptoms worse if you are dealing with the stressors of traveling.  Find ways to reduce your stress by making sure you are packed well in advance prior to your flight so you are not rushing out the door.  Print off or download your boarding pass so you don’t have to stop at the kiosk.  Also allow for additional time in getting checked in to the airport.  Nothing proves to be more stressful than trying to rush to catch your flight.   

  3. Pack Light

    – Carrying on a suitcase is preferable to most people.  Lifting it over your head to get it in the overhead bin can be downright painful.  If you are unable to lift things due to your back issue, then consider checking your bag instead.  This will prevent any additional injury or strain on your back.  If that is not the best option and you really want to take a carry on, pack as light as possible and ask a fellow passenger or flight attendant to help assist you in getting it into the overhead bin.  If you only need a shoulder bag to carry on, consider a back pack instead.  This will evenly distribute the weight of your items as opposed to carrying it all on one side of your body.  

  4. Bring Comfortable Items

    – Although one tip to travel light is important, do not skimp on those things that will provide you with extra support and comfort.  Lumbar pillows or neck pillows are great for support.  These usually have loops on them that can be either clipped to your carry on bag or fit in a small purse or backpack.  Bringing an ice pack can also help keep your pain at bay.  You can always ask a restaurant or coffee shop within the airport for a small bag of ice.  Be sure to bring any medications you currently use for back pain or an extra dose of ibuprofen or Tylenol, assuming you are cleared to take those kinds of pain reducers.  Don’t forget your earphones to listen to soothing music, an e-book or relaxing movie to make the time pass quicker.

  5. Book a Non-Stop Flight

    – Non-stop flights are the best way to go, however, that is not always possible depending on your location.  If a non-stop flight is not available to your destination, then find a flight that has ample time in between to get you from gate to gate.  This will keep the stress levels down as well knowing you don’t have to rush to a gate to make the next leg of your flight.

These tips of course are just suggestions.  Always get advice from your doctor on how you can travel safely for what you are being treated for.

Health Vantis

info@healthvantis.com

877-344-3544