Newsletter January 2020

How Long Will You Wait for Surgery in 2020?

According to the Fraser Institute, over a million Canadians were waiting for a medical procedure in 2019. The median wait times from GP referral to treatment was reported as 20.9 weeks.

Usually, if the medical matter is urgent, one gets treated promptly here in Canada. When it does not involve a medical emergency, the provincial government health plans consider these elective procedures and/or non-urgent.  It doesn’t mean that the provincial insurance won’t cover what you need to have done, in most cases, however, you may just have to wait.

When it involves something that creates limitations in your day to day function, then it sure seems like it is urgent.  Constant pain is physically limiting and distracting with difficulties in focusing. The quality of life suffers. If you are a working adult, a decrease in your productivity or ability to work occurs.

Pain is the main indicator that something is wrong. Living with severe pain may produce a chain reaction. You may not be able to develop the coping skills required.  This may cause you to become unproductive, unable to exercise or possibly put you into a depression. Although doctors are getting more cautious with giving opioids out for pain control, they still do. This is considered a risk. Being on them in the short term may be appropriate but long-term usage will have more serious consequences such as addiction. Also, when you take an opioid it masks the pain. This could result in you to pushing yourself more than you should which can create or complicate your problem further.

The longer you have an ailment that is being untreated, the higher the chance of making things worse. For example, take a knee replacement. Our knees bear all of our weight when we walk or run, or simply are upright. They are the main hinge between the ground and the rest of our body. They allow us to get around. Waiting too long for your surgery can be counterproductive.

Your function going into surgery dictates how you will function afterwards. The longer you wait, the more muscle tone you lose which will make your recovery much longer and harder. Something spotted early may only require a minor procedure. Delaying that could cause, in the case of a knee, destruction to the knee joint to where it is so severe that a total knee replacement is now needed.

Needless to say, waiting in line to get medical help can be hurtful. To get help sooner, consider your private options. Call Health Vantis to find out the costs of private surgeries and how to obtain them in a safe and affordable manner. We are here to help. Toll-free 877 344 3544.

 

How Long Does a Private Joint Replacement Last?

Private Hip Replacement

Those suffering from arthritis in their joints are probably aware that a hip or knee replacement will relieve the pain for good. However, going through a total joint replacement surgery is undertaking a serious, albeit considered very successful surgery. If all non-surgical methods fail, your doctor will recommend a total hip or knee replacement.

One of the questions for your doctor should be “How long will my hip or knee last?”. It is an important factor to consider. Younger people are advised to wait to avoid future revisions. A standard answer to the longevity of the joint replacement has been 10-15 years.

A new study for hips and knees that came out in February 2019, tells us that joint replacements last longer. The study looked at almost 300,000 total knee replacements and over 200,000 total hip replacements. 58% of total hip replacement lasted 25 years. Total knee replacements had even longer longevity – 82% lasted 25 years.

Those numbers are encouraging for the aging population of North America. It is worth to note, however, that the study collected data from joint replacement surgeries performed in New Zealand, Australia, Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden. The results can differ in Canada. One of the private medical facilities we work with in the USA uses implants that are rated to last for 40 years. They also use robotics for the highest accuracy for private knee replacements.

It is ultimately your decision if you prefer to wait or get it done sooner. If you are put on a waitlist for a joint replacement and no longer can deal with waiting, Health Vantis can help access private hip or knee replacements. Give us a call to find out the details. Toll-Free 1 877 344 3544

Pre-op Testing: What Is Needed?

Once you make your decision to proceed with the surgery Health Vantis makes all the arrangements for you. One of the moving parts of preparation for surgery is pre-op testing. The requirements can be different, depending on the procedure you require and your individual health.

The two most common tests the doctors we work with ask our clients to complete are bloodwork and EKG. Blood work within the last 3 months prior to surgery is usually accepted. If more recent blood work is required, you can schedule a visit with your family doctor and ask for a requisition of what is needed. It usually takes a couple of days to get the results and those can also be picked up at your family doctor.

If you are over 65 and/or have high blood pressure or other cardiological issues, an EKG test is required. In most provinces, it is fairly easy to get. Again, this can be done through your family doctor.

If the results of the EKG are concerning, a cardiological clearance is required. This one is not as easily obtained as the EKG or blood work. Most of the facilities we work with can suggest a local cardiologist that can schedule a consult on short notice to accommodate your surgery date. The cost varies per doctor and location and will be communicated to you by Health Vantis upfront.

Sometimes, when there is a GYN surgery involved, the surgeon would like to see the results of the most recent PAP test. This is done to ensure the overall health of the client is acceptable for surgery.

If you are considering private surgery and have any questions, we are here to help! Toll-free 1 877 344 3544

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